Today's Devotions

Showcase: Trust

  • Trusting Relationship +

    Do I trust in God--do I know God? Is that why I don't overflow with all joy and peace, because Read More
  • Trust: The Key to Perseverance: the film Legend of the Guardian +

    Whether flashy or humdrum, evil has the propensity to discourage us, to deter us from following the direction of Christ's Read More
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Don  CarsonGenesis 23;

Matthew 22; Nehemiah 12; Acts 22

THE CLOSING VERSES OF Matthew 22 (Matt. 22:41-46) contain one of the most intriguing exchanges in the Gospels.

After successfully fending off a series of tricky questions designed rather more to trap him or demean him than to elicit the wise answers he actually gives, Jesus poses a question of his own: "What do you think about the Christ [i.e., the Messiah]? Whose son is he?" (22:42). Some Jews thought there would be two Messiahs — one from David's line (the tribe of Judah) and one from the tribe of Levi. But not surprisingly, the Pharisees here give the right answer: "The son of David" (22:42). Now Jesus drops his bombshell: "How is it then that David, speaking by the Spirit, calls him 'Lord'? For he says, 'The Lord said to my Lord: Sit at my right hand until I put your enemies under your feet'"(22:43-44).

Jesus is citing Psalm 110, identified by the superscription as a psalm of David. If a mere courtier had written the psalm, then when he wrote "The LORD says to my Lord," he would have been understood to mean "The Lord [God] said to my Lord [the King]." In fact, that is the way many liberal scholars interpret the psalm — which means, of course, that they must ignore what the superscription says. But if David wrote the psalm, then the "my Lord" whom he addresses must be someone other than himself. The explanation offered by many students of the Bible, both Jewish and Christian, over the centuries, is correct: David, "speaking by the Spirit" (22:43), writing what is called an oracular psalm (i.e., an oracle, a prophecy immediately prompted by the Spirit), is referring to the Messiah who was to come: "The LORD [God] said to my Lord [the Messiah]." And what he said, in the rest of the psalm, establishes him as both universal king and perfect priest.

In days when family hierarchies meant that the son was always viewed as in some ways inferior to the father, Jesus drives home the point he is making: "If then David calls him [i.e., the Messiah] 'Lord,' how can he be his son?" (22:45).

The implications are staggering. The Messiah from the line of David would, on the one hand, doubtless be David's son, removed by a millennium from David but nevertheless in the throne succession. But on the other hand, he would be so great that even David must address him as "my Lord." Any other conception of the Messiah is too small, too reductionistic. The Old Testament texts pointed in the right direction generations earlier. But there will always be people who prefer the simplifications of reductionism to the profundities of the revelation in the whole Bible.

Genesis 23; Matthew 22; Nehemiah 12; Acts 22

Reflections to Consider

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Publications

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Music

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Audio & Video

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Favorites

  • Canticle of the Turning by Gary Daigle, Rory Cooney & Theresa Donohoo +

    1. My soul cries out with a joyful shoutthat the God of my heart is great,And my spirit sings of Read More
  • Come Alive (Dry Bones) by Lauren Daigle +

    Through the eyes of men it seems Read More
  • First by Lauren Daigle +

    Before I bring my need Read More
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Hidden Blessings

  • Your Grace Is Enough by Matt Maher +

    Great is Your faithfulness, oh GodYou wrestle with the sinner's heartYou lead us by still waters and to mercyAnd nothing Read More
  • Christ is Risen by Matt Maher +

    Let no one caught in sin remain*Inside the lie of inward shameWe fix our eyes upon the crossAnd run to Read More
  • Lord, I Need You by Matt Maher +

    Lord, I come, I confessBowing here I find my restWithout You I fall apartYou're the One that guides my heart Read More
  • Hold us together by Matt Maher +

    It don't have a job, don't pay your bills Read More
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