Today's Devotions

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Showcase: Matt Maher

  • Your Grace Is Enough by Matt Maher +

    Great is Your faithfulness, oh GodYou wrestle with the sinner's heartYou lead us by still waters and to mercyAnd nothing Read More
  • Christ is Risen by Matt Maher +

    Let no one caught in sin remain*Inside the lie of inward shameWe fix our eyes upon the crossAnd run to Read More
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Don  Carson

http://www.esvbible.org/Numbers+26

http://www.esvbible.org/Psalm+69

http://www.esvbible.org/Isaiah+16

http://www.esvbible.org/1+Peter+4

AT ONE LEVEL, Psalm 69 finds David pouring his heart out to God, begging for help as he faces extraordinary pressures and opponents.

We may not be able to reconstruct all the circumstances that are presented here in poetic form, but David has been betrayed by people close to him, and his anguish is palpable.

At another level, this psalm is a rich repository of texts quoted or paraphrased by New Testament writers: "Those who hate me without reason outnumber the hairs of my head" (69:4; see John 15:25); "I am a stranger to my brothers, an alien to my own mother's sons" (69:8; cf. John 7:5); "for zeal for your house consumes me" (69:9; see John 2:17); "and the insults of those who insult you fall on me" (69:9; see Rom. 15:3); "but I pray to you, O LORD, in the time of your favor; in your great love, O God, answer me with your sure salvation" (69:13; cf. Isa. 49:8); 2 Cor. 6:2); "they put gall in my food and gave me vinegar" (69:21; see Matt. 27:48; Mark 15:36; Luke 23:36); "they . . . gave me vinegar for my thirst" (69:21; see Matt. 27:34; Mark 15:23; John 19:28-30); "may their place be deserted; let there be no one to dwell in their tents" (69:25; see Matt. 23:38; Acts 1:20); "may they be blotted out of the book of life" (69:28; cf. Luke 10:20).

For the sheer concentration of such citations and allusions in one chapter, this psalm is remarkable. Of course, they are not all of the same sort, and this brief meditation cannot possibly probe them all. But several of them fall into one important pattern. This is a psalm written by David. (There is no good reason to doubt this attribution from the superscription.) David is not only the head of the dynasty that issues in "great David's greater Son" (as the hymn writer puts it), but in many ways he becomes a model for the king who is to come, a pattern for him — a type, if you will.

That is the reasoning of the New Testament authors. It is easy enough to demonstrate that the reasoning is well grounded. Here it is enough to glimpse something of the result. If King David could endure scorn for God's sake (69:7), how much more the ultimate King — who certainly also suffers rejection by his brothers for God's sake (69:8). If David is zealous for the house of the Lord, how could Jesus' disciples possibly fail to see in his cleansing of the temple and related utterances something of his own zeal (John 2:17)? Indeed, in the minds of the New Testament authors, such passages link with the "Suffering Servant" theme that surfaces in Isaiah 53 — and is here tied to King David and his ultimate heir and Lord.

Numbers 26; Psalm 69; Isaiah 16; 1 Peter 4

Reflections to Consider

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Publications

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Music

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Audio & Video

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Favorites

  • The Cleansing of the Temple by RC Sproul +

    http://www.ligonier.org/account/dashboard/sermon/151/download/ In this incident of Jesus cleansing the temple, Dr. Sproul points out that the activities being performed were legitimate, Read More
  • The Prodigals by Kevin DeYoung +

    During the Gospel Coalition conference in 2013, Kevin DeYoung gave a thoughtful, spirit-led sermon on Luke 15. He was able Read More
  • Centered on one or the other by Ray Ortlund +

    ". . . a friend of tax collectors and sinners!" Luke 7:34 What does it mean for a church to be gospel-centered? That's Read More
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Hidden Blessings

  • Book of God, Walter Wangerin +

    I was in a leadership turbogroup during the spring of 2007. At Randy's suggestion, I listened to Walter Wangerin's audio Read More
  • Martin Luther’s Quiet Time, Walter Trobisch +

    Martin Luther had a barber named Peter Beskendorf who asked his world-famous customer and doctor of theology, "Dr. Luther, how Read More
  • Clay Enoch Devotional Sculpture +

    Clay Enoch, a sculptor in Colorado Springs, Colorado, creates powerful bronze sculptures with Biblical themes: Creation, Praise, Contrition, Still Water, Read More
  • Without Faith...Can I Survive? +

    Examine yourselves to see whether you are living in the faith. Test yourselves. Do you not realize that Jesus Christ Read More
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