Today's Devotions

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3

Showcase: Forgiveness

  • Total Forgiveness, RT Kendall +

    This was a valuable resource for me in a time of hurt from a brother in Christ. I could not Read More
  • Forgiveness: Desmond Tutu +

    Nobel Peace Prize Winner Desmond Tutu explains how love and forgiveness kept post-apartheid South Africa from tumbling into anarchy. Read More
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3

Boston bombsYesterday afternoon two bombs went off near the finish line of the Boston Marathon. Dozens were injured and at least three people were killed—including an eight-year-old boy.

When we learned of the event at work, we were shocked. Two of my co-workers were in Boston just a few days prior to this event. One co-worker had a family member running in the Boston Marathon that day.

For a moment there was silence.

Sometimes that's the best response to tragedy.

When the silence ends, it's tempting to start asking questions:

Who did this? How do we respond? What should we do now?

As of this writing, no one has claimed responsibility for the bombing. Someone may eventually claim responsibility. Some may try to use the event as an opportunity to push a particular agenda.

That includes Christians who like to say things like "This is God's judgment on America's sin."

If there's any "agenda" for Christians to put forward, maybe it's this:

There will be a day when eight-year-olds won't die in explosions. There will be a day when people won't set off bombs in America or any nation in the world.

There will be a day when we don't have to wonder "why"—and a day when all our tears will be wiped away.

But today's not that day.

Today we still live in a world where evil exists; where sin runs rampant and people die.

Christian, don't offer answers right now. Weep with those who weep. Mourn with those who mourn.

But don't forget the promise of the one who wipes away every tear from every eye and has promised, "Surely, I am coming soon!"

And whenever we are confronted with evil like the events in Boston, our prayer should be the same as the Apostle John's:

Come, Lord Jesus.

http://www.bloggingtheologically.com/2013/04/16/on-bombs-and-boston/

 

Reflections to Consider

  • 1

Publications

  • 1

Music

  • 1

Audio & Video

  • 1

Favorites

  • The Lives of the Mystics-an interview with Emilie Griffin +

    An interview with Emilie Griffin—author of the new book Wonderful and Dark Is This Road—on the lives of Mystics and how they Read More
  • We Shall All Be Reunited by Patty Griffin +

    Where is now my father's familyThat was here so long ago?Sitting 'round the kitchen firesideBrightened by the ruddy glow Read More
  • Doorways into the prayer life by Emilie Griffin +

    Emilie Griffin spoke at a 1999 Renovaré International Conference Read More
  • 1

Hidden Blessings

  • Freedom of Simplicity, Richard Foster +

    In Freedom of Simplicity Foster gently encourages us to see that our identity, our sense of comfort and security must Read More
  • Celebration of Discipline, Richard Foster +

    The Path to Spiritual Growth The book on spiritual disciplines. Read More
  • Spiritual Classics, Richard Foster and Emilie Griffiin +

    Selected Readings for Individuals and Groups on the Twelve Spiritual Disciplines Good collection of essays, saints throughout the ages. A Read More
  • Prayer by Richard Foster +

    A prayer Richard Foster uses when beginning a time of contemplation: By the authority of Almighty God, I surround myself Read More
  • 1