Today's Devotions

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Showcase: The Gospel

  • Talking About the Gospel +

    A discussion from 2008 with Tim Keller, John Piper, and D.A. Carson. Read More
  • Gospel-Centered Ministry by Tim Keller +

    Excerpts From A Sermon Gospel-Centered Ministry; 1 Peter 1:1-12 and 1:22-2:12; By Tim Keller I am here to talk to Read More
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Don  Carson

http://www.esvbible.org/Numbers+32/

http://www.esvbible.org/Psalm+77/

http://www.esvbible.org/Isaiah+24/

http://www.esvbible.org/1+John+2/

ASAPH MUST HAVE GIVEN A LOT of thought to the question of what believers should remember.

 Psalm 75, we saw yesterday, commends the power of godly "recital" — a retelling of what God has done so as to bring near God's name." The importance of remembering and retelling is at the heart of Psalm 78. And here in Psalm 77, Asaph highlights yet another element in this theme.

Asaph finds himself in great distress (77:1). Its causes we do not know, but most of us have passed through "dark nights of the soul" when it seems that either God is dead or he does not care. Asaph was so despondent he could not sleep; indeed, he charges God with keeping him from sleep (77:4). Memories of other times when circumstances were so bright that he sang with joy in the night hours (77:6) serve only to depress him further. Bitterness tinges his list of rhetorical questions: "Will the Lord reject forever? Will he never show his favor again? Has his unfailing love vanished forever? Has his promise failed for all time? Has God forgotten to be merciful? Has he in anger withheld his compassion?" (77:7-9 ).

What Asaph resolves to focus on is all the ways God has disclosed himself in power in the past. He writes: "To this I will appeal: the years of the right hand of the Most High" (77:10) — in other words, he appeals to all the displays of strength, of the deeds of God's "right hand," across the years. "I will remember the deeds of the LORD; yes, I will remember your miracles of long ago. I will meditate on all your works and consider all your mighty deeds" (77:11-12). So in the rest of the psalm, Asaph switches to the second person, addressing God directly, remembering some of the countless deeds of grace and power that have characterized God's dealings with the covenant people of God. He remembers the plagues, the Exodus, the crossing of the Red Sea, the way God led his people "by the hand of Moses and Aaron" (77:13-20).

Christians have all the more to remember. As Asaph "remembered" the Exodus by reading Scripture, so we have even more Scripture. We remember not only all that Asaph remembered, but things he did not know: the Exile, the return from exile, the long years of waiting for the coming of the Messiah. We remember the Incarnation, the years of Jesus' life and ministry, his words and mighty deeds. Above all, we remember his death and resurrection, and the powerful work of the Spirit at Pentacost and beyond.

And as we remember, our faith is strengthened, our vision of God is renewed, and the despair lifts.

Numbers 32; Psalm 77; Isaiah 24; 1 John 2

Reflections to Consider

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Publications

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Music

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Audio & Video

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Favorites

  • The Cleansing of the Temple by RC Sproul +

    http://www.ligonier.org/account/dashboard/sermon/151/download/ In this incident of Jesus cleansing the temple, Dr. Sproul points out that the activities being performed were legitimate, Read More
  • The Prodigals by Kevin DeYoung +

    During the Gospel Coalition conference in 2013, Kevin DeYoung gave a thoughtful, spirit-led sermon on Luke 15. He was able Read More
  • Centered on one or the other by Ray Ortlund +

    ". . . a friend of tax collectors and sinners!" Luke 7:34 What does it mean for a church to be gospel-centered? That's Read More
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Hidden Blessings

  • Book of God, Walter Wangerin +

    I was in a leadership turbogroup during the spring of 2007. At Randy's suggestion, I listened to Walter Wangerin's audio Read More
  • Martin Luther’s Quiet Time, Walter Trobisch +

    Martin Luther had a barber named Peter Beskendorf who asked his world-famous customer and doctor of theology, "Dr. Luther, how Read More
  • Clay Enoch Devotional Sculpture +

    Clay Enoch, a sculptor in Colorado Springs, Colorado, creates powerful bronze sculptures with Biblical themes: Creation, Praise, Contrition, Still Water, Read More
  • Without Faith...Can I Survive? +

    Examine yourselves to see whether you are living in the faith. Test yourselves. Do you not realize that Jesus Christ Read More
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